Playing Catch-up, Like Everyone Else

Farmer Iron

Heading into this food-oriented week, I think of the tech and tools it takes to raise a crop.

Published on: November 19, 2012

Sorry blog readers, I've been tied up on a few things the past couple of weeks, so I've slipped behind schedule. I'm working to get on track and enjoy your readership and comments (when you have time to make 'em).

Thanksgiving is a super time for all of us. We're thankful for what we have - and in this nation we have plenty to be thankful for in a nation where there's food everywhere. Those of us who get our income from farming (even an editor who writes about ag is getting an income from farming), have a unique perspective of what it means to put food on the table.

I got the opportunity to attend the US Farmers and Ranchers Alliance Food Dialogues in person last week, it's a heady experience with a lot of great conversation; and I'm hoping a slow moving of the dial from darkness to understanding about how modern agriculture works. It brought to mind some excellent conversations I had in my younger days when a group of us would talk out a topic in an effort to try to understand it better.

THANKFUL: This is a stock image, but you get the idea. Good food comes from great farms.
THANKFUL: This is a stock image, but you get the idea. Good food comes from great farms.

So what does this have to do with a column focused on equipment? Many times there was talk in the dialogues and elsewhere about the technology we bring to bear in this business. As the consumers sit down at their tables do they really think about the tractors, combines, tillage tools, cranberry harvesters, turkey processors and others that make sure the meal is safe, nutritious and frankly low-priced? Probably not.

The equipment you invest in makes having food on our tables easier than ever. This is my annual "Thanks" to those hard-working readers who make sure that when I head to the store and into the kitchen this week I'll have all I need, ready to cook and of course, ready to eat.

No holiday is more concentrated on food than Thanksgiving, and as we sit down to eat Thursday, no reader or consumer should forget all of the work that goes into raising the food. We are all in this together.