Enjoy the Sights and Sounds of Indiana This Fall

Hoosier Perspectives

Change of season will be welcomed by many.

Published on: October 1, 2012

My youngest daughter, Kayla, is a senior in high school. I accompanied her on a campus visit to Purdue recently. Yes, she's been there dozens of times and knows she wants to go to college there, she just doesn't know in what. Oh, the challenges and yet fantastic opportunities youth have today.

At one point during the day as we walked between buildings, she caught me off guard. "Look, dad, they're changing," she said, pointing toward a tree. I don't hear so well right now due to an ear infection, and I thought she had spotted a squirrel. The old joke is that Purdue has plenty of squirrels when school is in session, both the four-legged and two-legged types.

Anyway, she meant the leaves. "The leaves are starting to turn!"

Well, yes, daughter dear, it is fall. That's what leaves do, and thank goodness it's one more sign the nightmare that was summer is officially over.

She was excited because she wants to take her senior pictures primarily on campus at Purdue, and she wants fall foliage as a backdrop. So in a couple weeks we'll probably head back and shoot photos of her at various spots on campus, maybe at the FFA monument near Ag Administration, at the Purdue Fountain next to the giant pencil outside the new education building, Beering Hall, or at some other spot. She thinks the foliage will make the pictures look good.

She likes fall just like her dad. It's my favorite season of the year. I have a strong medical and psychological aversion to heat, so I've suffered two years in a row. Fall is cooler weather, apple cider, harvest, as skimpy as it may be, soil judging, pumpkins, petting zoos at apple orchards out to make a few extra bucks, farm tours and much more. It's a time to enjoy grandchildren, and just breathe in crisp air now that summer is behind us and before winter arrives.

Your fall may seem like a disappointment if you're basing it strictly on crop yields. The one bright spot is that without much to harvest, it will likely go quickly. If you have the time, check out neat places to visit in Indiana in the fall, including the covered bridge festival in Parke County and the sights of Brown County and Nashville, amongst others.

After the year that farmers and farm families have been through, they all deserve a break. For some, it's a good year economically, for others it's a disaster. But fall can provide a time to catch your breath and think about what it will take to go forward. Enjoy an Indiana fall before the harsh realities of winter set in. There's nothing quite like fall in Indiana!