Clearing Up a Web Myth

Farmer Iron

Been forwarded an astounding video that includes 'farm equipment'? Don't bet on it.

Published on: July 11, 2011

This week one of my editors - who shall remain nameless - got caught up in one of those continuing Web myths that for some reason refuses to go away. While what he sent was pretty cool, in fact the story he was given was false.

Somewhere in the body of a much-forwarded email you may see the following:

Read this first, then watch. This is almost unbelievable. See how all of the balls wind up in catcher cones.

This incredible machine was built as a collaborative effort between the Robert M. Trammell Music Conservatory and the Sharon Wick School of Engineering at the University of Iowa . Amazingly, 97% of the machines components came from John Deere Industries and Irrigation Equipment of Bancroft, Iowa . Yes, farm equipment.

It took the team a combined 13,029 hours of set-up, alignment, calibration, and tuning before filming this video but as you can see, it was well worth the effort.It is now on display in the Matthew Gerhard Alumni Hall at the University and is already slated to be donated to the Smithsonian.

It is now on display in the Matthew Gerhard Alumni Hall at the University and is already slated to be donated to the Smithsonian.

 

The Machine You Won't Believe.

Here's a link to the VIDEO.

Trouble is, that whole commentary is FALSE. The video shows an astounding machine that creates music by bouncing what appear to be ball bearings around a bunch of pipes and tubes. It's cool, but it doesn't exist anywhere but as bits and bytes in a fast graphics computer somewhere. It was originally created by a company called Animusic and there are no farm equipment parts (except perhaps in the mind of a computer animator). When you check out the video link you'll also see other videos by the company.

 

Animusic has an entire collection of these mesmerizing videos; but again none are in a museum anywhere as real items. Just another myth to deal with; so when someone forwards the video to you - enjoy it, it's really cool. But remember it's not a University of Iowa project using Deere parts. It's just an imaginative bit of computer art and you know the REAL story.

Just a service I like to provide from time to time.