Amazing New E-World A Pleasure To Be In

Western Ag Vignettes

I am an elder of the e-generation, because I was part of the transition years.

Published on: May 28, 2013

I am e-generation.

But I remember when I was not. When electricity had not yet become electronics and charged the globe with super cyber teckietonics.

I am an elder of the e-generation, because I was part of the transition years. I began my journalistic career pecking on a manual Royal 440. When they brought in the IBM electric Selectrics with their magic ball of letters, it was revolutionary.

We hadn't seen anything yet!

Univac was our intro into the e-world, bringing us scanner copy, which had to be typed very carefully within red lines so it could be scanned into the computers, which only were found on editor's desks back then.

Even with that change, I saw fellow reporters balk and quit with what seemed to be some moral objection to the new.

I am an elder of the e-generation, because I was part of the transition years.
I am an elder of the e-generation, because I was part of the transition years.

We hadn't seen anything yet.

Next, screens did appear on each reporter's desk, but a bulky manual and endless seminars on using them accompanied their arrival. A few in the news room understood this gadgetry, and I constantly was crossing the room to talk with one of the learned gurus to find out how to reboot.

Still, we hadn't seen anything.

Those screens got bigger and the concept easier to understand, yet even this generation of computers were conceptually challenging.

We learned about "garbage in, garbage out," or "GIGO," which we quickly learned was only the teckies' way of blaming users for their own glitches.