A Wish List?

Farmer Iron

Seems like a good time put some wishes on 'paper' for the New Year.

Published on: December 24, 2009

I've just come in from shoveling the first 7 inches of what promises to be three waves and 18 inches for Christmas. I may never sing that song again, but a little hard work shoveling (no snow blower here - suburban driveway is too short so no need) is good for the soul.

This time of year, near the end, is often a time of reflection. We've had a good hear at Farm Progress. Our shows saw tremendous crowds because you folks like to see new stuff; touch it; talk to the suppliers. And we do all we can to make your visit to Decatur (last year) and Boone (next year) and Grand Island and Syracuse (every year) worth your while. Our magazines continue to be filled with information we know you need because in this market information is an important tool.

A lot of bloggers talk about a wish list. Mine's pretty simple. I want to hear from you when you have an idea, or disagree with me, or whatever. Keeping in touch with you is valuable for us ivory tower types who don't have to take care of our pigs, or worry about that last 60 acres of corn now nestled down for a long winter's nap - in the field.

I also want y'all back next year - that means being safe. I know how hard farming is and no matter the conveniences your suppliers throw at the market - new tech does make you more productive - little can overcome a fatigued farmer who makes one mistake. Just be careful out there - especially this winter when you're doing what a lot of city slickers wouldn't dream of considering - spending time in the cold (all day).

Saw a comment posted on a weather blog the other day just after a city meteorologist warned people not to go out in the cold. There was a worry about frostbite. One farmer responded noting he had no choice, his cows needed him to milk them, and take care of them.

This is an equipment blog, so I don't spend a lot of time commenting on ag issues, but as you've probably seen in the past, I worry about ag's perception in the media. As you go into 2010, be ready to tell your story of comfortable animals kept disease free for future tasty meals; on demand; when I want 'em. Be ready to talk about the technology you use today that allows you to get more income from every acre without a significant increase in the inputs you need to raise that crop.

And remember, you have a lot of fans out there. People who do know what you do for a living and how vital your role is. My final wish? That you feel my gratitude for all you do. Let' talk tech for 2010 and enjoy this business we all get to be part of.